Why Your Dashboards are a Downer & How to be Positive with Data

I dashboards can be difficult for frontline workers to use because they are often designed for managers and analysts, focus on failures, and require technical expertise. However, data analysts can use positive psychology to create a more positive and engaging experience

Why Your Dashboards are a Downer & How to be Positive with Data
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Why Frontline Workers Hate Dashboards

Frontline workers, such as those in manufacturing, retail, or healthcare, often find it difficult to use business intelligence (BI) dashboards. There are a few reasons why this is the case:

First, many BI dashboards are designed with managers and analysts in mind, rather than frontline workers. They may be complex and difficult to navigate, and may not provide the information that is most relevant to the daily work of frontline workers.

Second, many BI dashboards focus on failures and areas where performance is lacking, rather than highlighting successes and areas where performance is strong. This can be demotivating for frontline workers, who may feel like they are being constantly criticized.

Third, BI dashboards often require a certain level of technical expertise to use, which many frontline workers may not have. This can make it difficult for them to understand and make use of the information presented in the dashboard.

Positive Psychology

To help frontline workers get more value from data, data analysts can use positive psychology. Positive psychology is the study of how people can thrive and live well. It can be used to create a more positive and engaging experience for frontline workers when working with data.

First, data analysts can use positive psychology by highlighting successes and areas where performance is strong, rather than focusing on failures. This can help to create a more positive and motivating environment for frontline workers.

Second, data analysts can use positive psychology by making the data more relevant to the daily work of frontline workers. By focusing on the information that is most important to them, data analysts can help to make the data more meaningful and actionable for frontline workers.

Third, data analysts can use positive psychology by providing training and support for frontline workers to help them understand and make use of the data. This can include providing training on how to use the BI dashboard, as well as providing support and guidance as needed.

Fourth, data analysts can use positive psychology by involving frontline workers in the data analysis process, giving them a sense of ownership and allowing them to contribute to the decision-making process.

Fifth, data analysts can use positive psychology by creating a culture of learning and continuous improvement, encouraging frontline workers to experiment and learn from data, and providing feedback and recognition for their efforts.

Finally, data analysts can use positive psychology by fostering a sense of community and teamwork among frontline workers, encouraging them to work together to achieve common goals, and celebrate their successes.

In summary, BI dashboards can be difficult for frontline workers to use because they are often designed for managers and analysts, focus on failures, and require technical expertise. However, data analysts can use positive psychology to create a more positive and engaging experience for frontline workers when working with data. This can include highlighting successes, making the data more relevant, providing training and support, involving frontline workers in the data analysis process, fostering a culture of learning and continuous improvement, and fostering a sense of community and teamwork.